Tag: reading

A Pratchett Memorial Book Haul

Yesterday the wife and I headed to the neighbouring town, as she was in need of some clothes and it has the only mall within eighty kilometres. Also the only bookshop. Yeah, I know.

I was browsing the shelves, not looking for anything in particular, and as is my wont I gravitated towards the fantasy section. This particular chain has never heard or either Jim Butcher or Neil Gaiman, but they often have significant markdowns on the titles they do stock, and I was pleasantly surprised to find not one, but two of Terry Pratchett’s more recent publications at half the regular price. Considering the great man’s passing this week, I took it as a sign.

The Long War and Dodger book covers
The Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter and Dodger by Terry Pratchett

I also picked up The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce. It’s not a Pratchett, but I’ve seen many references to this novel online, it looks like a fun read, and it was also half-price, so why not?

Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce

As I’m feeling all melancholic at present, I think I’ll be putting my current read (a non-fiction book on Quantum Theory) aside for now and first read Dodger.

While we’re talking about reading, head on over to The Book Notes Project for a fun questionnaire on what you’re reading at the moment.

New Books!

I just thought I’d introduce you to the latest additions to my bookcase.  I ordered them a few weeks ago during the school holidays, but they only arrived today.

Death Masks, American Gods and Blood Rites
Death Masks and Blood Rites by Jim Butcher and American Gods by Neil Gaiman

This does not bode well for the studies…

P.S. Tune in tomorrow for my review of Ursula le Guin’s A Wizard of Earthsea and The Tombs of Atuan.

Ten books that stand out in my reading life

A couple of months ago Emma at A Wordless Blogger tagged me for the Ten Influential Books Tag.  I’ve recently decided not to do awards anymore, partly because I keep getting nominated for the same award over and over, partly because I am out of eleven facts to share about myself, partly because I never know who to nominate, but mostly because I forget about the things until I one day start clearing out no longer relevant bookmarks in my browser and discover there are a bunch of old award nominations I just never got around to.

But this blog-tag sounded fun, as I’m all about books, reading them and writing them, after all.  Then I ran into a problem:  this tag contained no description, only a name.  And what does it mean if I say “Ten most influential books”?  The most influential books ever?  As Jimmy over at Dysfunctional Literacy never gets tired of pointing out, you can’t nominate any book the best ever unless you’ve read them all.

Okay, books that have influenced me, then.  That’s a tough one.  Sure, there have been books that have influenced me, my way of thinking and my outlook on life, but most of them were non-fiction, many of them were academic texts, and I can’t remember them specifically – when I come across something significant which I want to add to my life, I absorb it and internalise it, I don’t make a note of where I found it (I also don’t highlight novels or write down quotes).

So I decided to decided to depart a little from the brief and share with you ten books that have stood out in my reading life thus far.

Click here to see what they are

On my February reading

Wow!  This is embarrassing.  See, there isn’t any.  I did not finish a single book this month.  It’s not that I wasn’t reading, cause I was, but I kept picking up lemons.

The first book I really tried to read, but between typos galore, chapters of backstory, unrealistic dialogue, descriptions so detailed they read like technical manuals, and dialogue tags that were just plain weird, I couldn’t make it past the first few chapters.  And it wasn’t a self-published novel, so it can’t be blamed on a lack of editing.  This novel went the whole route of querying, editing and proofreading.  Come to think of it, maybe the problem lies with me.  In fact, all the reviews I’ve seen of the novel were praising its brilliance, leaving me somewhat confused because I just can’t see it.

For my second attempt I chose a James Patterson.  I’d never read anything of his before, but my dad’s a big fan and has all his books, so I plundered my dad’s bookcase.  Jester, which Patterson co-authored with Andrew Gross, is a historic novel about a French dude who goes to the Crusades and comes back to find his wife has been carried off by raiders.  Sounds fun, right?  Edge of your seat, sword battles, jumping castle walls with a catapult…wait, I think I’m describing a different story now. Continue reading “On my February reading”

On the half-way mark

On the half-way mark

I can’t believe that it’s already the halfway mark of National Novel Writing Month.  While I’m not yet caught up on my words, as you can see from the image below it’s going much better than it did when I had made my last update.

NaNoWriMo stats Day 17

For the past few days I’ve been managing a daily word count of over two thousand words and I’m catching up.  At the moment I’m wrapping up the climax of the first act of my novel after which I’ll have to do a spot of planning again to incorporate the new ideas that have popped into my head while writing the first twenty-two thousand, which will include coming up with names for a couple of new supporting characters, but I don’t foresee any major problems and I hope to be caught up and maybe even ahead by Friday.  (By the way, that’s one horrible run-on sentence I wrote there, isn’t it?  I hope none of them have made it into the novel thus far.) Continue reading “On the half-way mark”